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Tag: Star Wars

Editorials

From Blockbuster to Mockbuster: Big Films and Their Copies

February 20, 2021
Big films and their copies [Source: Digital Spy]

Have you ever been shopping and noticed a DVD/BluRay for a movie that looks like a recent release? E.g. The Little Panda Fighter or Guardians of the Tomb? The world is full of bad copies and rip-offs of popular movies. And today, we’re looking at some examples of films that fell flat on their faces (according to the scores available on Rotten Tomatoes,) trying to capitalise off bigger films.

Gamera copied Godzilla

Of course, rip-off/copy movies aren’t a new phenomenon, as this entry proves. Gamera was Daiei Studio’s answer to Godzilla and both movies have similar plots. Both are about giant monsters, awakened by atomic devices, attacking Japan while the government tries to find a solution to get rid of the monster. Gamera’s initial outing failed in comparison to Godzilla’s (Gamera (1965) has a critical rating of 20% and an audience score of 32% on Rotten Tomatoes. But Godzilla (1954) has a 93% critical rating and an 89% audience rating). Nonetheless, the giant fire breathing turtle has since found cult success with his own franchise.

Gamera V Godzilla
Gamera V Godzilla // Credits: Daiei Film (Left) & Toho Studios (Right)

Battle Beyond The Stars copied Star Wars and Seven Samurai

Produced by the low-budget film kingpin Roger Corman and written by future Oscar-nominated screenwriter John Sayles, Battle Beyond the Stars has a simple premise. Remake Seven Samurai with Star Wars’ sci-fi fantasy aesthetic. Despite BBTS’ cult following the general impression it left wasn’t favourable (Critics: 45% Audience: 41%) especially compared to the gargantuan success of Star Wars (Critics: 92% Audience: 96%) and Seven Samurai (Critics: 100% Audience: 97%).

Battle Beyond the Stars is Seven Samurai with a Star Wars skin
Battle Beyond the Stars is Seven Samurai with a Star Wars skin // Credits: New World Pictures (Left), 20th Century Fox (Top Right) & Toho (Bottom Right)

Contamination copied Alien

But copies and rip-offs are hardly exclusive to the American and Japanese market. The 1980s Italian film industry produced many films to capitalise on international hits. Contamination was one of several releases produced to capitalise on Ridley Scott’s Alien. Mostly through its use of alien eggs which wreak havoc on the human body.  Needless to say, Contamination was unfavourably received compared to Alien (Contamination- Critics: 40% Audience: 29%. Alien- Critics: 98% Audience: 94%). But Contamination attained its own legacy when it became part of the infamous video nasties list.

Alien eggs on Earth and on LV-426
Alien eggs on Earth and on LV-426 // Credits: Arrow Video (Left) & 20th Century Fox (Right)

Ator: The Fighting Eagle copied Conan the Barbarian

Speaking of Italian copies. Conan The Barbarian (1982) inspired many sword and sorcery films in the 80s and Ator: The Fighting Eagle is incredibly close to Conan in terms of story elements. Focusing on a musclebound sword-wielding hero’s quest for revenge against an animal-themed cult leader who killed his parents and kidnapped a young woman. Although Ator couldn’t copy Conan’s success with audiences (Conan has a 74% audience rating, Ator has 14%), Ator acquired 3 sequels. A lot more than the Conan series.  

Ator and Conan getting ready to fight
Ator and Conan getting ready to fight // Credits: Filmirage (Left) & 20th Century Fox (Right)

Mac and Me copied E.T.

Now we get to one of the weirdest rip-offs on our list. This movie focuses on an alien that comes to Earth and befriends a child while a shadowy organisation pursues him (sound familiar?). What makes this title weird is that it was created to promote McDonald’s and its charities. Predictably this knock-off suffered poorly (Critics: 0% Audience: 38%) in the shadow of the classic movie it copied (Critics: 98% Audience: 72%).

Mac and Me copies E.T. [Credits: Orion Pictures (Left) & Universal Pictures (Right)]
Mac is a lot creepier than E.T. // Credits: Orion Pictures (Left) & Universal Pictures (Right)

Snakes on a Train copied Snakes on a Plane

Snakes on a Train is very emblematic of most of The Asylum film studio’s output. Their titles are made to lure people in by being as close as they can to other films. Both this and Snakes on a Plane concern snakes coming after people in confined spaces. Snakes on a Plane didn’t receive rave reviews (49% Audience Score on RT). Even so, Snakes on a Train was hated (18% Audience Score).

The posters for both movies // Credits: The Asylum (Left) & New Line Cinema (Right)

Ratatoing copied Ratatouille

Video Brinquedo was one of the most shameless modern mockbuster companies. Released to bank off the success of Pixar’s Ratatouille, both movies deal with a rodent obsessed with making food. However, Ratatouille won an Oscar and is loved by audiences (87%) and critics (96%). While everyone dislikes Ratatoing’s ugly style and cheap animation (27% on RT).

Ratatoing copies Ratatouille [Credits: Video Brinquedo (Left) & Buena Vista Pictures Distribution (Right)]
Can you spot the difference? // Credits: Video Brinquedo (Left) & Buena Vista Pictures Distribution (Right)

Thank you for joining me on this excursion into the land of copies and rip-offs. What rip-offs do you hate? Have you ever mistakenly bought any copycat titles? Conversely, are there any copycats that are better than their inspiration? Please let us know.

Also Read: Online Film Festivals Are Here To Stay

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Editorials

George Lucas: Beyond Star Wars

January 14, 2021

Whether you are a fan or not of the franchise or not, it is impossible to escape Star Wars. Lucas’ science fiction fantasy blasted into cinemas in 1977 and has been a huge pop culture fixture ever since. Although Lucas did not direct the two follow ups, he remained a driving creative force (pun intended), and later directed the prequel trilogy several years later.

With such a huge success on his hands, it’s not much of a suprise to find that Star Wars dominated Lucas’ life and career. When Disney bought Lucasfilm for $4 Billion in 2012, Lucas effectivly retired from filmmaking. Although it may be his most well know and influential work, Lucas was involved in several other projects and has actively changed filmmaking as we know it.

THX 1138

THX 1138
THX’s visuals are often praised and have some clear influences on Star Wars (Lucasfilm, 1971)

Lucas’ first feature film, based on his award-winning short film, was a dystopian sci-fi about a world where the population takes emotion suppressing drugs. On its initial release in 1971, it received mixed reviews and a poor box office reception. However, since the success of Star Wars and the director’s cut (with CGI additions of course) the film has gained a cult following. There are several references to the film throughout other projects Lucas was involved in, such as the cell block Princess Leia is in.

American Graffiti

Harrison Ford in American Graffiti
Harrison Ford’s role in American Graffiti would lead to his most famous roles as Han Solo and Indiana Jones (Lucasfilm, 1973)

Lucas’ second feature had much better reception and is held in high standards today. It currently features in the list of “1001 Movies to Watch Before you Die“. Lucas and his friend, Francis Ford Coppola, had to fight the studios to get a theatrical release after they demanded cuts and planned it to be a TV movie. It is notable for its heavy use of licensed music, and including a full list of cast and crew in its end credits, which are both common practice now. It also featured a young Ron Howard and a breakout role for Harrison Ford. Although it was nominated for several Oscars, including Best Picture, it did not win any.

Indiana Jones

Indiana Jones
Raiders of the Lost Ark became an instant classic (Lucasfilm, 1981)

Arguably his second most popular work, and again featuring Harrison Ford, Lucas is a writer on the first three entries in the series, and an Executive Producer on the fourth. Famously pitching the script to Spielberg while on holiday to escape the madness of Star Wars. Lucas wrote a detailed timeline of Jones’ adventures. Some of which were used for The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones, a tv series which he wrote and produced.

Lucasfilm

Lucasfilm
Lucasfilm has an animation division.

Although the company is mostly associated with Star Wars, they have produced or been involved with films outside of the franchise. Most notably Indiana Jones. However, they have also produced several independent films, such as Jim Henson’s Labyrinth, Willow (Lucas has a “story by” credit) and another children’s animated classic The Land Before Time. While these were relatively successful, or have gone on to be, they also produced some flops, such Radioland Murders (another “story by” credit) and the infamous Howard the Duck. The last film the company released before being acquired by Disney was Red Tails, which Lucas served as an Executive Producer on, and even directed some footage, as it was a passion project for him.

Industrial Light & Magic

ILM has worked some of the biggest films of the last few decades

Outside of actually making films, one of the biggest contributions to cinema Lucas has made was the foundation of Industrial Light & Magic. Initially, just a small team that worked on the original Star Wars, it quickly expanded and has now worked on over 300 films, including Terminator 2, Jurassic Park, Transformers and the Avengers films. The company has won 16 Best Visual Effects Oscars and 40 additional nominations. ILM are also responsible for creating the Photoshop software before it was sold to Adobe. The studio has created groundbreaking special effects and continues to do so

As his friend Francis Ford Coppola lamented, Star Wars took over Lucas’ career, for better or worse. Although it may have prevented him from directing more films, he still had a very active and interesting career as a producer and ideas man and helped lead the way for visual effects.

Also Read: The Mandalorian: A New Hope For Star Wars

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Editorials

These Ten Movies Ruled The U.K Box Office in 2020

December 23, 2020
UK Box Office 2020 Film Collage

2020 has been an incredibly demanding year for the film industry. From postponing filming to delaying releases and to having to deal with fewer cinemas and more streaming platforms. While we certainly didn’t have many cinematic releases, there were still many movies that hit our big screens. When looking back at the ten most popular films, that were released in the cinema before hitting streaming platforms, it makes 2020 certainly feels much longer than only 366 days.

1917 (Official Trailer)

1. 1917

Yep, that stunning movie by director Sam Mendes was released right at the beginning of this year. It feels ages ago since we saw the one-shot stunning looking cinematography from Roger Deakins, telling the thrilling story of two soldiers having to prevent an extremely deadly attack during World War I. However, nothing could be further from the truth. 1917 hit the UK cinemas on the 10th of January, right before the award season during which it won 111 awards amongst which were three Oscars and seven Baftas. No wonder that this movie generated £43,903,280, especially when you look at the outstanding performances by Dean-Charles Chapman and George MacKay.

2. Sonic The Hedgehog

After being critiqued because of the bad CGI and the need to re-invented Sonic for his latest movie, director Jeff Fowler probably couldn’t have predicted that his film would be number 2 in the top 10 movies of 2020. With Ben Schwartz voicing the hyper-active Sonic and James Marsden and Jim Carrey accompanying him in this adventurous and joyful movie, Sonic The Hedgehog raced towards £19,148,545.

3. Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker

Ok, this movie was released in 2019 but due to its 19th of December release date, Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker was part of the 2020 box office. Director J.J. Abrams decided to bring the Skywalker saga to an end with the legendary and thrilling conflict between the Jedi and the Sith. Even after all those years, the likes of  Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca and Rey are still relatively popular as they helped Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker gaining £18,830,197 at the UK Box Office.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

4. Little Women

Little Women didn’t only mean another collaboration between Greta Gerwig and Saoirse Ronan but also a new revival of the story of the four March sisters. With a cast including Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Eliza Scanlen and Timothée Chalamet, the beautiful Louisa May Alcott’s story and the lovely cinematography, it’s no surprise that the movie collected £17,705,104.

5. Tenet

If there’s one movie that was talked about the most this year, it’s without a doubt Tenet by director Christopher Nolan. Not only because this was the only movie (apart from the recent Wonder Woman 1984) released mid-pandemic but also because of its mind-blowing storyline, cinematography and cast. The movie ‘only’ generated £17,454,173, but knowing that it was released when not a lot of cinemas were open and that it still made it into the top five, Tenet didn’t do too bad.

6. Bad Boys For Life

It was more than 17 years since we saw the last adventures of the detectives Marcus Burnett (Martin Lawrence) and Mike Lowrey (Will Smith) and it was time to bring them together for one more investigation. The audience loved Bad Boys For Life as the movie got £15,969,160 and another sequel.

Bad Boys For Life (Official Trailer)

7. Dolittle

Seeing Robert Downey Jr. talking to adorable animals while stepping into the fantasy world of Hugh Lofting and his creation Dr. John Dolittle? This was something the audience could do from the 7th of February. Some people were hailing Dolittle as a wonderful escape while others were declaring it one of the worst movies of 2020. Despite those mixed reactions, the film still had a box office of £15,938,399.

8. Jumanji: The Next Level

Just like Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker and Little Women, Jumanji: The Next Level was released at the end of last year. Still, it was eligible for this years’ box office, and therefore it made it into this top 10. During this sequel to the 2017 movie Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, Dwayne Johnson, Jack Black, Kevin Hart and Karen Gillan came back together, and this latest adventure generated £14,798,295.

9. Parasite

If there’s one movie that described the darkness and strange time we’re going through, it’s Parasite. While the storyline is different, it’s as twisted as 2020, and it seems that both the critics and audiences loved it. The story of one family taking over the lives of another wasn’t only the biggest winner of the Oscars (that photo from director Bong Joon-Ho holding those four awards seems like it was taken so many years ago) but it was also £12,033,376 worth at the box office.

10. The Gentlemen

This latest Guy Ritchie was the very first movie released this year, and despite its £11,555,773, The Gentlemen delivered an entertaining and action-packed movie. Not surprising though, if you know that the stellar cast includes the likes of Matthew McConaughey, Charlie Hunnam, Michelle Dockery, Colin Farrell, Henry Golding and Hugh Grant.

The Gentlemen (Official Trailer)

Also Read: Top 10 Films at the UK Box Office in 2020 (So Far)

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Reviews

Retro Review: Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back

December 18, 2020
the-empire-strikes-back [Source StarWars.com]

To mark its 40th anniversary and the sad passing of actor David Prowse today we are reviewing the original version of what many (including myself) consider to be both the best Star Wars film and one of the best films ever made, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back.

Synopsis

Three years after destroying the Death Star, Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), and the rebels are hiding from imperial forces. Who are led by Darth Vader (David Prowse & James Earl Jones). After the rebels retreat from the planet Hoth, Luke leaves for Dagobah. To continue his Jedi training with Master Yoda (Frank Oz). Meanwhile, Vader, at the behest of the Emperor (Clive Revill), relentlessly pursues Han Solo (Harrison Ford), Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher), Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew), and C-3PO (Anthony Daniels) to use them against Luke. The story culminates at Bespin’s Cloud City where the battle for the galaxy changes forever.

Empire Strikes Back
Vader and Luke’s lightsaber duel from The Empire Strikes Back [Credit: Lucasfilm]

What did I like?

Empire’s production work is astounding. Sequences like the asteroid field chase required an incredible amount of work to accomplish, in terms of effects. But it feels more fluid and dramatically engaging than many modern action films. Wonderful creations like Yoda, despite being a puppet, feel very real. Thanks to the great puppetry and direction. And I must mention John Williams’ score. Which weaves between, romance, mysticism, blistering action, and oncoming doom without ever feeling overdone or misplaced. And contains the introduction of arguably film’s most iconic musical piece, the Imperial March.

Then there is Empire’s fantastic script. Which makes each character, even minor ones, feel fully rounded. While managing to be both funny, with plenty of moments of levity. And brave, as many characters end the movie having lost something. But because these emotions are built-up effectively and feel in keeping with the character’s personalities it all works. Also many may not notice Irvin Kershner’s direction thanks to the film’s natural flow. But subtle touches, like showing Vader’s power through his ship’s shadow falling over the imperial fleet, or the slow-motion Dagobah cave fight, create an effective foreboding atmosphere. Without being distracting.

And there’s the fantastic cast. A New Hope’s leads (Hamill, Ford, and Fisher) now feel more comfortable in their roles and really show their range. Believably taking their characters to brave new places. Billy Dee Williams (Lando Calrissian) is an intriguingly complex addition, who effortlessly navigates many conflicting motivations and emotions throughout his journey. Frank Oz’s Yoda is fascinating, with his weary voice and broken speech hiding the galaxy’s wisest being. Clive Revill and Jeremy Bulloch (Boba Fett) leave a great impression with incredibly brief screen time. But the MVPs are James Earl Jones and David Prowse who have more time to shine as Darth Vader. Prowse’s intimidating figure and mannerisms and Jones’ deep vocals make Vader feel like a terrifying force of nature. But they also give Vader a lot of depth through subtle vocal ticks and physical actions. Making him into the perfect cinematic villain.

Empire Strikes Back [Source Empire]
David Prowse and James Earl Jones as Darth Vader [Credit: Lucasfilm]

What did I not like?

Reluctantly, some criticisms of Empire are worth addressing. Firstly, the special edition releases, which update the film’s effects and included elements to fit later series continuity e.g. including Return of the Jedi’s Ian McDiarmid as the Emperor, aren’t needed. The original version is so brilliantly constructed that even minor green screen glitches never ruin the experience. Other changes serve only to remind you of other franchise films. Or to fix what didn’t need fixing (e.g. Luke screaming as he falls in Cloud City) rather than improving the story. The original version is superior.

Some also feel that Empire isn’t as strong without the first movie to attach us to the characters. However, through action and dialogue, Empire does a great job at filling in the gaps. Allowing us to easily invest in our players without needing prior knowledge.

Finally, many point to storytelling elements like the time scale and Luke’s ready belief of the twist, as narrative flaws. Regarding the time scale – Luke appears to train with Yoda for days while the Millennium Falcon crew appears to be fleeing for only a few hours – there is no concrete timeline for the length of each story. So there’s enough room for it to not affect the overall narrative flow. And while initially, Luke appears to swallow the twist too easily, plenty of information is seeded about his father’s dark past and Luke’s downfall is his unwillingness to believe the seemingly impossible. Making Luke’s ready belief make more sense.

Luke Skywalker [Source StarWars.com]
Luke Skywalker learns the truth [Credit: Lucasfilm]

Verdict

Empire’s only flaws are either softened upon repeat viewings, problems of public perception, or the product of unnecessary re-editing. Everything else about Empire is perfect. Whether it’s the writing, directing, performances, the score, or the production work. The Empire Strikes Back is, for me, the greatest film ever made.

Verdict: 5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)

Also Read: The Mandalorian: A New Hope For Star Wars

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Editorials

The Mandalorian – A New Hope For Star Wars

November 26, 2020

Since Disney bought Star Wars in 2012 it would be fair to say they have had mixed success. Apoplectic fans have denounced all three of the last trilogy and Solo was not well-liked either. The TV series The Mandalorian has actually been there most successful creation (successful here means critical and fan appeal, not making money, in that sense I think Disney are very happy).

The Mandalorian

The Mandalorian with "Baby Yoda" (Credit: Disney)
The Mandalorian with “Baby Yoda” (Credit: Disney)

The show stars Pedro Pascal as the titular character, an exceptionally good bounty hunter always hidden behind his near priceless Mandalorian armour. The character’s bounty hunter code is challenged when sent after a morally difficult target and he chooses to do the right thing. The show is set in between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens and is heavily focused on the chaos that follows the death of the Emperor.

The Golden Age Of Television

There was a time when film was the perceived cultural superior to television but in the last twenty years things have changed – this is the Golden Age of television. Film and television can tell stories in different ways – in my opinion, Goodfellas and The Sopranos are the high-points of the portrayal of gangsters in their respective mediums but have different strengths and weaknesses. The Mandalorian has a main story arc but within that are numerous smaller stories, characters who get to shine in a particular episode. It often felt with the Star Wars films you are getting a glimpse of a huge universe, whilst and TV shows can go into depth.

One benefit to doing a TV show over another film trilogy would be that a film trilogy would inevitably feel it had to be about saving the galaxy and with some even bigger ultimate weapon. The Mandalorian is about saving one child and a smaller story can actually be more engaging.

The Trouble With Trilogies

Star Wars - The Phantom Menace
The Phantom Menace (Credit: Disney)

I don’t think I’ve ever been as excited about a film as I was about The Phantom Menace and like many, I convinced myself it wasn’t that bad, but that couldn’t last. The prequels were a disaster with a few redeeming features – there are many, many problems with them ranging from casting to too much CGI to just being boring. The text crawl at the start of The Phantom Menace talks about tax disputes and while I do think a movie could be made about war sparking from something that dull The Phantom Menace failed.

Star Wars: The Last jedi
The Last Jedi (Credit: Disney)

It’s hard to even discuss the sequel trilogy without being overwhelmed complaints of the fans – they’re too much like the original trilogy, they’re too different to the original trilogy, Rey is a Mary-Sue, they ruined Luke, and then there’s the torrent of sexism that was also present in much of the criticism. For what it’s worth I think the sequels have problems but are much better than the prequels. The Last Jedi is an uneven film yet it has amazing parts to it – Luke and Kylo Ren’s confrontation is incredibly well done and a brilliant way to deal with their history. The biggest problem might have been it felt that the different directors had different ideas of what they wanted to do.

The Star Wars Universe

Star Wars - Nien Nunb & Lando Calrissian
The next hero of a Star Wars TV show – and I don’t mean Lando (Credit: Disney)

There is a wealth of material for more television shows. Aside from the films, there are a variety of TV shows, dozens of books, graphic novels, computer games and more:

The Old Republic – The Empire overthrew the Galactic Republic but there would be wars, conflict and interesting stories throughout this period. It could explore the time when the Jedi were at the height of their power.

It’s not all about the war – There’s a lot more going than just the civil war between the Empire and Rebel Alliance – there are bounty hunter guilds, crime syndicates, strange religions and more.

So Many Characters – There are a wealth of interesting existing characters. What about Chewbacca’s life before Han? Or ace rebel pilot Wedge Antilles – the only pilot to have fought in both Death Star battles? I was genuinely thrilled when Nien Nunb (pictured above) turned up in the sequels – for those who don’t know Nunb is the small alien who co-piloted the Millennium Falcon with Lando Calrissian in Return of the Jedi and would love to see more of him. If they’re willing to embrace the Dark Side, Disney could explore Darth Vader’s war against the Jedi.

Whatever happens next we all know Disney aren’t going to stop making Star Wars films and tv shows – let’s just hope they’re worthy additions.

Also Read: Was It Really That Bad?: Star Wars Episode 9: The Rise of Skywalker

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Editorials

#FilmTwitter Gives Their #UnpopularOpinion On Movies – Do You Agree?

November 17, 2020
Simpsons mob against unpopular opinions [Source GQ]

Over the years certain opinions have become dominant in the film community, such as Citizen Kane is the greatest movie ever made, the Star Wars prequels are bad; Hollywood is out of ideas and it becomes unpopular to disagree. But, today we are going to look at some unpopular film opinions on Twitter, and analyse what makes them unpopular.

1. Star Wars: The Rise of Positivity

The only thing Star Wars fans agree on is that Star Wars (1977) and The Empire Strikes Back are great. However, from there opinions vary wildly. Some find Return of the Jedi either a fitting end to the original trilogy or a dumbed-down entry for kids. Most people initially didn’t like the Prequels and Disney’s handling of the property has produced mixed critical and fan reactions, to say the least. So perhaps the most controversial thing a Star Wars fan can do currently is resist the pull of the dark side and say, “there are zero bad Star Wars movies”. Well, MoviePreviewShow managed it.

2. My Not so Fair Lady

My Fair Lady was a real winner in its time. It won 8 Oscars including Best Director, Best Actor in a Leading Role, and Best Picture. Although, viewed all these years later people like Martin Something-or-other find that My Fair Lady leaves a lot to be desired.

3. Defending Daredevil (2003)

The exact opposite of our last entry. The Ben Affleck Daredevil movie was derided upon its release. However, since then it has gained a cult following. It was also given a director’s cut release which many say makes the film into something special. Because superhero movies are currently taking a break maybe it’s time to revisit Daredevil (2003)? You may find yourself like Retro Gamer.

4. Battle of the Directors

Martin Scorsese is considered one of the best directors of all time. Creating great films like Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, The King of Comedy, Goodfellas, and Wolf of Wall Street to name only a few. But can he compete with Brian De Palma the director of classics like Carrie (1976), Scarface (1983), The Untouchables, and underappreciated gems like Phantom of the Paradise and Dressed to Kill? Not according to RVD the Dudar.

5. Excellent Adventure Vs Bogus Journey

When most people speak about the Bill and Ted films, they talk about the first entry, Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Which is understandable, because it is the highest-rated and highest-grossing film in the franchise. But Direct Questions thinks the claim that it’s the series’ best film is bogus. He believes Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey is the superior film.

6. Streaming Wars

With a lot of production companies moving into the streaming market, many are beginning to make their content exclusive to their own services. Which definitely doesn’t sit well with Jonathan Boyd.

7. The Horror of Children

The opinion that children in movies are more annoying than they are effective is nothing new. Though kids in horror films not being scary when movies like The Innocents (1961), The Exorcist, The Omen (1976), and The Shining (1980) exist? Eric S. Kim’s opinion is definitely controversial.

8. Trashing Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino is one of modern cinema’s most acclaimed filmmakers. With several of his films being considered among the best ever made. However, as with anyone who is well acclaimed there are always those who believe them to be overrated. But which camp do you fall into? Are you a true Tarantino aficionado or are you like Global Affairs?

9. Stay Mysterious

Many agree that trailers and reviews sometimes give too much away. But how much should you know about a movie to become interested? To Rigmarole Film a movie is improved vastly when you know as little as possible going in. And therefore, have more of an open mind.

10. Henry Cavill’s Superman

Henry Cavill’s Superman films generally divided opinion among both audiences and critics. However, some people, like (thereal)Chris Grant Jr., consider him to be their favourite Superman portrayal.

So ends our brief look at unpopular film opinions circulating social media. What do you think about some of these controversial opinions? What are some of your film hot takes? Please let us know.

Also Read: The Film Fan’s Guide To Time Travel

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Editorials

Top 10 Films at the UK Box Office in 2020 (So Far)

May 22, 2020
The 2020 Box Office [Sources: Cineworld Cinemas,The Guardian; imdb]

With UK cinemas still closed we may as well run down 2020’s highest box office grossers so far. Today I’ll look at how much the highest earners took at the UK Box office (using Box Office Mojo and Google Money Converter). These numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred thousand and are correct at the time of writing (20/05/20)) and what critics; audiences thought of them.

10. Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn (£9,400,000)

Cathy Yan’s DC Universe offering sees Harley Quinn teaming up with a group of female heroines to fight against the evil Black Mask.

Audience Thoughts: 78% – Rotten Tomatoes / 6.2 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “While watching Birds of Prey, it becomes clear that comic book movies are still going to dominate the box office for many years to come. If any of those could be as much fun…then we would be over the moon.

Harley Quinn and the Birds of Prey
Harley Quinn and the Birds of Prey swoop into 10th place at the UK Box Office [Source: Empire]

9. Parasite (£12,000,000)

Bong Joon Ho’s Best Picture winner sees the poor Kim family scam their way into working for the rich Park family. But do the Kim’s deserve our sympathy and what secrets are the Park’s hiding?

Audience Thoughts: 90% – Rotten Tomatoes / 8.6 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “It’s dark, funny, clever, surprising, and I’m sure I could use almost every adjective in my lexicon.

Parasite
Best Picture Winner, Parasite smashes into 9th place [Source: Americamagazine.org]

8. The Gentlemen (£12,300,000)

Guy Ritchie’s latest gangster films focused on an American marijuana emperor trying to leave the business. But various factions conspire to extort him for all he’s worth.

Audience Thoughts: 84% – Rotten Tomatoes / 7.9 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “It is a coarse, convoluted, comical caper that exults in the joys of genre.”

The Gentlemen
The Gentlemen swan into 8th place [Source: Den of Geek]

7. Jumanji: The Next Level (£16,100,000)

The gang from Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, along with new additions Danny Glover and Danny DeVito, return to Jumanji to face new challenges. 

Audience Thoughts: 87% – Rotten Tomatoes / 6.7 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “Jumanji’s next level is rather satisfying.

Jumanji
The Jumanji gang jump back into the UK Box Office [Source: Entertainment Weekly]

6. Dolittle (£16,700,000)

Robert Downey Jr. leads an all-star cast as the famous doctor who can talk to animals sets out to find a cure for an ailing young Queen Victoria.

Audience Thoughts: 76% – Rotten Tomatoes / 5.6 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “It really is horribly inert, and every time Downey opens his mouth to say something unintelligible, the film dies a bit more.

Robert Downey Jr as Dolittle
Despite a critical thrashing Dolittle soars into number 6 at the Box Office [Source: GamesRadar]

5. Bad Boys for Life (£17,000,000)

Mike Lowrey and Marcus Burnett must team up with a team of younger cops to take down the leaders of a violent drug cartel.

Audience Thoughts: 96% – Rotten Tomatoes / 6.7 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “Bad Boys for Life is … pure enjoyment and entertainment.

Bad Boys returns to the UK box office
The Bad Boys return in glorious fashion [Source: RogerEbert.com]

4. Sonic the Hedgehog (£19,100,000)

Sonic and his friend Tom race to San Francisco to find the rings to transport Sonic off-world before Dr. Robotnik catches them.

Audience Thoughts: 93% – Rotten Tomatoes / 6.6 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “The world contains many terrible video game movies. This isn’t one of them.

Sonic rushing into the box office top 10
Sega’s blue speedster rushes into the top 10 [Source: Hollywood Reporter]

3. Little Women (£19,400,000)

Greta Gerwig’s remake of the literary classic follows the March sisters as they experience career hardships, romance, tragedy, and triumph during and after the American Civil War.

Audience Thoughts: 92% – Rotten Tomatoes / 7.9 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “Though we can’t foretell whether time will be cruel or kind to Gerwig’s “Little Women,” it may just be the best film yet made by an American woman.”

Little Women stands tall at the box office
Greta Gerwig’s Little Women stands tall at number 3 [Source: Britannica]

2. Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker (£20,100,000)

The Skywalker Saga concludes. Emperor Palpatine returns to threaten the galaxy. Rey and the remnants of the resistance must find a way to stop him. While contending with the rage of Kylo Ren.

Audience Thoughts: 86% – Rotten Tomatoes / 6.7 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “It doesn’t do anything new or even terribly distinctive, but maybe it didn’t have to. It just had to be good enough to stick the landing, and it does that.

Rise of Skywalker rises to number 2 at the uk box office
The Skywalker saga’s final swipe took the 2nd place in 2020 so far [Source: Deadline]

1. 1917 (£46,600,000)

Presented in a pseudo-continuous shot 1917 follows two soldiers tasked with physically delivering orders for a battalion to stand down before German forces kill them all.

Audience Thoughts: 88% – Rotten Tomatoes / 8.3 – IMDb

Critics Thoughts: “1917 will have you on the edge of your seat from the very first moment and will leave you breathless.

1917 is number 1 at the box office
1917 stands atop the box office [Source: Letterboxd]

This year’s top 10 collective taking may be comparatively low (over £188 million) but with a relatively diverse group of creative teams (including 2 solo female directors and a foreign-language film) and an interesting mix of tales (including three original properties not based on pre-existing work or part of larger franchises), 2020 is more interesting than 2019. Which was dominated by comic book adaptations, remakes, and sequels to popular franchises (mostly from Disney and their subsidiaries). Hopefully, the upcoming months will bare good tidings for UK cinemas.

Also Read: What Happens To Your Brain When Watching A Horror Film

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Editorials

Was It Really That Bad? Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker

May 20, 2020

The Rise Of Skywalker had the odds stacked against it very early on. Original director Colin Trevorrow was replaced by J J Abrams, legacy star Carrie Fisher had tragically passed away, and it had to not only follow up The Last Jedi, which proved incredibly divisive but also end the trilogy as well as the nine-film Skywalker Saga. Initial reactions were not positive. Fans on either side of The Last Jedi debate were dissatisfied with the “undoing” of several plot elements, the return of arch-villain Palpatine and the film’s reliance on nostalgia and references to the original trilogy. Now that some time has passed, it’s time to revisit Episode IX and ask, was it really that bad?

“I have a bad feeling about this”

Whatever faults this film has, at least it gave us Babu Frik (Disney, Luasfilm, 2019)
Whatever faults this film has, at least it gave us Babu Frik (Disney, Luasfilm, 2019)

Rise of Skywalker currently sits at a 6.7/10 on IMDb, putting it just ahead of Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, and scoring the least of the sequel trilogy. On Rotten Tomatoes, it has the second-lowest score of the whole franchise, with only the animated Clone Wars film scoring lower. After the division that The Last Jedi caused in the fandom, it was important for the final installment to have more universal appeal, unfortunately, in trying to appease everyone, the film doesn’t take any risks and relies heavily on nostalgia, without any of the buildup that made the orignal moments so satisfying and iconic. In addition, many of the plot points were retconned, Rey did have an important lineage, Kylo Ren donned his mask again, and Palpatine was brought back from the dead by cloning or dark magic or… something.

So, without the magic of a midnight screening, would I see the stitches holding this film together? Well.. yes and no

“Bring balance to the Force”

Reading the reviews for Rise of Skywalker (Disney, Lucasfilm, 2019)

Some of the film’s faults are apparent right away, Palpatine, after dying in Return of the Jedi, has returned with an ominous and vague plan. How he returned is handwaved over, almost like the film is trying to jedi mind trick you, and his message announcing his return to the galaxy is never heard (except in Fortnite, because of course). Although it is always wonderful to see Ian McDiarmid as the Emperor, his presence doesn’t really add anything other than tie up some plot threads that had already been dealt with. And while the film does seem to go out of it’s way to attempt to put things back on track, it really doesn’t do that much damage when compared to some of the orginal retcons. Let’s not forget that Vader and Anakin Skywalker were once two seperate people, and that Luke and Leia weren’t related. While the Rey reveal in particular does more harm than good, she does still have a solid arc about choosing her own family.

The film also has a few plot points that don’t make much sense, such as the Sith dagger. It does feel like it’s jumping through hoops to explain some elements but not others. Again though, this isn’t a problem unique to this entry, Palpatine’s plots are hilariously convoluted in the prequels as well as Luke’s rescue mission in Episode VI. It also leans very heavily on nostalgia. Nearly every iconic moment from the original films is referenced. Some of these moments work better than others. But the things the film expands upon are some real highlights. The connection between Rey and Kylo Ren remains the best thing about the trilogy. Their “Force Skype” power expanding to allow physical objects to pass between them adds an intriguing new dynamic. The final duel between them is suitably dramatic. The main trio finally being together is wonderful and some legacy characters get a great sendoff.

Was it really that bad?…No

It doesn’t manage to compete with top tier entries, but it certainly isn’t the worst. It feel more like a sequel to Force Awakens than Last Jedi and it can’t quite decide what it wants to be or have guts to stick with some plot points. It feels rather similar to Solo, which isn’t a bad thing, but feels to safe for what should be the final word in the story.

Would Trevorrow’s version have been an improvement? It’s hard to say as the two are very different, but have some interesting similarities.

Overall, this one just needed more time in the oven. The rushed development and behind the scenes drama creates a lack of vision, but there is still a solid action flick in here akin to Force Awakens or Abram’s Star Trek reboot.

Also Read: Was It Really That bad?: Star Wars Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace

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Editorials

Famous Movie Props in the Hands of Collectors

April 25, 2020

After the recent article looking at props for sale, it felt like time to look at some props that ended up in the hands of some very lucky collectors. Often times these props will sell for many times the amount it cost to create them, due to their status in pop culture and movie history. The most desirable props are often the version known as the “the hero” prop. Hero props are the ones used in close-ups or shots where they are the centre of attention. They are usually the most detailed version and sometimes are functioning, with lights, for example. Often multiple version will be made, such as rubber versions for stunts.

R2-D2 – Star Wars: A New Hope/ The Empire Strikes Back/ Return of the Jedi (1977-1983)

Several of the R2-D2 props that were used throughout the original trilogy (Lucasfilm, 1977)

Star Wars is full of iconic props, such as the miniatures for X-Wings, TIE Fighters, and of course, lightsabers. There are some very memorable costumes and creature designs, such as Chewbacca the Wookie, Stormtroopers and the fearsome Darth Vader. One of the most expensive mementoes from the series to have been sold at auction is an R2 unit. One of the Radio Controlled/Prop units was sold at an auction for over $2.7 million

The Maltese Falcon – The Maltese Falcon (1941)

“The stuff that dreams are made of” (Warner Brothers, 1941)

Perhaps the most famous Macguffin in all of cinema. The Maltese Falcon is a priceless statuette that Humphrey Bogart and several others spend the whole film trying to obtain. Several models were made for the film, with the hero prop being a heavy lead model. Ironically even though the (Spoiler alert, but come it’s been nearly 80 years) Falcon is a fake, the lead prop used in the film (complete with dents from Bogart dropping it several times) was sold at an auction for over $4 million dollars.

Indy’s Hat – Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)

If the owner isn’t running around wearing it while humming the theme tune then why did they even bother? (Credit: Nils Jorgensen / REX / Shutterstock)

Arguably the most iconic elements of the character of Indiana Jones, aside from Harrison Ford’s performance and that theme tune, are his hat and whip. Indy’s hat is so iconic that one could almost say “it belongs in a museum”. There were actually several hats, some of which were actually sat on and had dust blown on it before filming to give it a more well-worn look, making Jones seem more of an experienced archaeologist. In 2018 one of the hats sold for a more than half a million dollars.

Delorean – Back to the Future Trilogy (1985-1990)

“Roads? Where we’re going we won’t need roads” Because it’s going in the garage (The Hollywood Reporter, 2016)

Up there with the TARDIS for iconic time travel vehicles, the Delorean is as much a character throughout the trilogy as Doc Brown or Marty McFly. The only car ever manufactured by the company, a total of seven were used for the trilogy. Only three of which remain, one is on display at the Peterson Automotive Museum in LA, another is owned by Universal Studios and is also occasionally on display. The third was sold to a private collector, with some of the proceeds going to the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research

Sting – Lord of the Rings Trilogy (2001-2003)

“It’s not really a sword, more of a letter opener..” (New Line Cinema, 2001-2003)

When the Fellowship sets out on its quest to destroy the One Ring, Frodo is given Bilbo’s old blade, Sting. An elven blade that glows blue whenever orcs or goblins are near, this prop was used throughout the entire trilogy and has actually gained some scratches and nicks in the blade from some of the combat during filming. The sword is incredibly detailed, like all Weta’s work for the films, including Elvish engraving, although no word on it glowing blue. Several weapons, including Anduril, were given away as promotional sweepstakes for the release of Return of the King.

Ruby Slippers – The Wizard of Oz (1939)

“Close your eyes, tap your heels together three times, and think to yourself, there’s no place like home” (MGM, 1939)

The Wizard of Oz is a classic that has survived generations, and will likely continue to be a firm favourite to many people. Despite its enduring popularity, the famous ruby slippers worn by Dorothy upon her arrival in Oz, have had a rough time of it. Only four pairs are known to have survived from the original production, with one pair safely on display in the Smithsonian museum after Leonardo DiCaprio, Steven Speilberg and others teamed up to save it, and another was recovered by the FBI over a decade after they were stolen. The other two pairs are thought to be with private collectors, although some believe that there are more slippers out there…

Also Read: 5 More Movies That Don’t Need a Sequel, Reboot or Remake

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Editorials

The Rise of Jon Favreau

January 31, 2020

Jon Favreau has quickly become one of the royalties of Pop Culture. Between kickstarting the Marvel Cinematic Universe with Iron Man, creating a Christmas classic with Elf, and giving the internet its newest obsession with Baby Yoda in The Mandalorian, it’s hard to imagine he originally considered becoming a fireman.

It’s clear that pop culture would look very different without his contributions, so with the start of a new decade, let’s take a look back at how Favreau rose to power

“I’ve always wanted to call the shots because I would rather fail than not have a chance to figure it out on my own”

Favreau and Vince Vaughn in "Swingers"
Favreau and Vince Vaughn in “Swingers” (Miramax, 1996)

Favreau studied at Queens College in New York but dropped out (twice) to pursue a career in comedy in Chicago. While there he scored a role in Rudy where he befriended Vince Vaughn on set. He had a few smaller roles, including a clown on Seinfeld. He then moved to Los Angeles, where he would get his big break.

While in LA, Favreau wrote and starred in Swingers where he plays a struggling comedian from New York. Vince Vaughn, who plays a struggling actor, befriends him and helps him get over his ex-girlfriend. Despite the low budget and guerilla filmmaking, the film was a success, making a star out of Vaughn and director Doug Liman.

“For a movie – any movie – to work, all the bread has to fall jelly side up; everything has to go right. You have to hit the zeitgeist “

Photo by REX/Shutterstock (436743s) WILL FERRELL AND DIRECTOR JOHN FAVREAU 'ELF' FILM  - 2003
Photo by REX/Shutterstock (436743s) WILL FERRELL AND DIRECTOR JOHN FAVREAU ‘ELF’ FILM – 2003

After Swingers, Favreau had a few more acting jobs. Including a billionaire UFC fighter who dated Monica during several episodes of “Friends”. He also appeared as himself in an episode of “The Sopranos”. He plays a Hollywood Director faking interest in a screenplay, in order to use the material for his own.

He also made his directorial debut with “Made”, a film about aspiring boxers getting involved in mafia crime. While it recived positive reviews, it had a very limited release. A few years later he played Foggy Nelson in Daredevil, his first interactions with Marvel.

But before Marvel came “Elf” the first post-SNL film from Will Ferrell. Favreau wasn’t initially interested, as it was “too dark” for him, but another rewrite and it became the classic we all know. This was the biggest film Favreau had ever worked on, but things were about to get much, much bigger.

“‘Batman Begins’ set the bar very high for the superhero movie, as it showed that you could get a great cast for these movies and take a real filmmaker’s perspective”

Favreau on the set of "Iron Man" with Terrence Howard and Robert Downey Jr. (Paramount/Disney 2008)
Favreau on the set of “Iron Man” with Terrence Howard and Robert Downey Jr. (Paramount/Disney 2008)

After Elf, and several TV cameos, came his next film, Zathura: A Space Adventure. It received positive reviews but was not very successful at the box office.

In 2008 Iron Man was released. The film had gone through an arduous development process but was finally moving ahead. His experience on Daredevil had introduced Favreau to Marvel producers, and they liked his grounded, spy take. The casting of Robert Downey Jr in the title role raised many eyebrows, but Favreau insisted he was the perfect choice.

Downey proved his critics wrong of course. Iron Man went on to be the eighth highest-grossing film of 2008, and launch the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Many of the films in the MCU follow Iron Man‘s structure, as well as tone.

“I think the bigger the movie is, the harder it is to maintain the idea of an auteur. You’re servicing something beyond just your own vision”

As well as serving as a producer on the Iron Man, Avengers, and Spider-Man film, he also appears as Tony Stark's aide Happy Hogan (Sony/Marvel 2019)
As well as serving as a producer on the Iron Man, Avengers, and Spider-Man film, he also appears as Tony Stark’s aide Happy Hogan (Sony/Marvel 2019)

After directing the follow-up, Iron Man 2 and serving as a producer on crossover team-up, The Avengers, Favreau decided to step back on the third film. Instead choosing to direct Magic Kingdom, he still worked as a producer and appeared in his role as Happy Hogan though. He directed the adaptation of Cowboys vs Aliens which did not do well critically or commercially.

After working on several multi-million dollar studio films, Favreau decided to take a break and developed a pilot for the TV show Revolution as well as directing the first episode. He then made Chef a “back to basics” indie film about a travelling chef. Several people saw the film as a response to Favreau’s experience with Marvel and wanting to strike out on his own again. It was well received and has even spun off into a Netflix show

Although the Magic Kingdom project has yet to move forward, he did work on two beloved Disney properties, the “live action” remakes of The Jungle Book and The Lion King. He has continued his work with Disney, creating and show-running The Mandolorian a series set in the Star Wars universe, for Disney+. This has also received widespread acclaim, as well as introducing the “The Child” or “Baby Yoda”.

With a second season on the way, as well as the Jungle Book 2 in development, it doesn’t look as though he will be slowing down anytime soon.

Also Read: The Biggest Financial Film Flops

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Editorials

Weapon of Choice: Iconic Weapons in Movies

January 13, 2020
Leatherface - Texas Chainsaw Massacre

Whether you’re a hero or villain you need a great weapon to help you vanquish your foes. And cinema is full of amazing weaponry. So, today we’re going to look at seven iconic movie weapons, who wielded them and their real-world origins.

Lightsaber (Star Wars Franchise)

The weapon of the most powerful beings in the galaxy far far away, the Sith and the Jedi. Many famous Jedi and Sith have wielded the multi-coloured laser swords. Including Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader, his son Luke Skywalker, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Darth Maul, Ben Solo/Kylo Ren, and Rey. George Lucas decided to include a futuristic sword in the original Star Wars as a symbol of honour and chivalry. And with only a 4×5 camera flash attachment (the hilt), sticks wrapped in reflective material (the blade); the hum of a projector and the buzz captured from a TV set (the sound effects) Lucas and company birthed arguably the most famous movie weapon of all time.

Vader and Luke’s lightsaber duel from The Empire Strikes Back [Source: Arbin Instruments]

Freddy Krueger’s glove (Nightmare on Elm Street Franchise)

Horror films have created several iconic weapons, some of which we will get into later. But horrors most inventively creepy killing implement is Freddy Krueger’s Razor Glove. Envisioned by director Wes Craven as a throwback to mankind’s primal fear of claws grafted onto modern equipment, not only is Freddy’s glove inventive but its very look is surreal and frightening. Perfectly fitting with the story’s nightmarish aesthetic.

Freddy Krueger's iconic glove
Freddy Krueger’s iconic glove [Source: NME.com]

Nunchaku (Bruce Lee Movies)

This traditional Okinawan martial arts training weapon has become a staple of martial arts movies specifically because of Bruce Lee. Bruce used Nunchaku in several of his movies (Enter the Dragon, Way of the Dragon & Game of Death). He wielded them with such speed, grace, and effectiveness that they were transformed in the public’s mind from mere training implements into incredible weapons in their own right.

Bruce Lee's nunchaku in Game of Death
Bruce Lee’s nunchaku in Game of Death [credit: Columbia Pictures / Sony Entertainment]

The Infinity Gauntlet (Marvel Cinematic Universe)

The MCU needed to give its ultimate villain Thanos a weapon that would make an impression on audiences after ten years of build-up. Made of Uru metal, forged by the dwarves of Nidavellir, with a design ripped straight from the original comic and armed with the infinity stones that collectively give the wearer the ability to do practically anything, including wiping out half of all life in the universe, the Infinity Gauntlet is, without doubt, the most destructive weapon on this list.

Thanos and the Infinity Gauntlet.
Thanos and the Infinity Gauntlet [credit: Disney / Marvel Entertainment]

Chainsaw (Texas Chainsaw Massacre Franchise)

Employing household tools as weapons is a common practice in slasher movies, and this is one of the movies to thank for that. Director Tobe Hooper originally thought of the idea to use a chainsaw as his movie’s weapon when he was wondering how to get out of the busy store and saw a chainsaw in the hardware section. One thing’s certain, audiences have never looked at chainsaws the same way since.

Leatherface's Chainsaw in Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
Leatherface’s Chainsaw in Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) [Source: Syfy Wire]

The Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch (Monty Python & The Holy Grail)

In 1975, the Pythons gifted us with possibly the silver screens silliest weapon. When confronted with the dreaded Rabbit of Caerbannog, King Arthur and his knights use the Holy Hand Grenade, originally used by Saint Atilla, to destroy the beast. Shaped like the Sovereigns Orb of the United Kingdom there is no better weapon to destroy your beastly foes and satirize religion.

The Holy Hand Grenade - Monty Python & The Holy Grail
The Holy Hand Grenade [Source: Addicted to Quack]

Revolver (Western Genre)

Everyone loves westerns and the one weapon that typifies the western is the revolver. Patented by Samuel Colt (later developed by multiple companies in the 1800s) as a singlehanded firearm, that can be fired several times without reloading. The revolver has become a symbol of the old west gunslinger. A weapon of great destructive capabilities that requires a keen eye and steady hand to master. No Mexican standoff is complete without one.

Clint Eastwood with iconic western revolvers
Clint Eastwood with iconic western revolvers [Source: AMC]

So ends my list of seven iconic movie weapons. Be sure to fire your suggestions for great movie weapons I missed into the comments.

Also Read: The Best Action Films of the Decade (2010 – 2019)

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News

Star Wars: Origins [Fan Film]

December 13, 2019
Star Wars: Origins

Star Wars: Origins takes a unique look at where it all began. A thrilling action-adventure, this film draws inspiration from both STAR WARS and INDIANA JONES to tell an epic story based on Earth during WWII.

The film described as “the epic fan film that will change the game” comes from award-winning team and life-long Star Wars fans; writer/director Phil Hawkins and Executive Producer Gary Cowan of Velvet Film Production.

Filmed in the Sahara Desert, Morocco, Star Wars: Origins is the culmination of three years’ work and stars Marie Everett (What Happened To Monday, Netflix), Jamie Costa (Han Solo: A Smuggler’s Trade), Hadrian Howard (The Mummy, Mi Rogue Nation) and Philip Walker.

Star Wars: Origins [Fan Film]

Also Read: Star Wars: May The Fan Film Be With You

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