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Tag: Ridley Scott

Reviews

Retro Review: Alien

March 5, 2019

Today we are looking at another significant film celebrating an anniversary. As this year Ridley Scott’s Alien turns 40. Alien has become a phenomenon over the past 40 years. Spawning one of the most iconic horror movie monsters, heroines and one of the best sequels ever made. But 4 decades on, has Alien aged well? Or has the franchise it spawned eclipsed the significance of the original film? Let’s find out.

The story

While heading back to Earth the crew of the spaceship Nostromo are awakened from cryo-sleep by the ship’s computer to investigate a distress signal coming from a nearby moon. During the mission, Kane (John Hurt) is attacked by a creature, which attaches itself to him and incapacitates him. Against officer Ellen Ripley’s (Sigourney Weaver) wishes, Science Officer, Ash (Ian Holm) lets him back onboard.

Eventually, Kane is freed from the alien’s grasp. But the lifeform left inside him by the alien kills him by erupting from his chest. Now, with an alien loose on the ship, the crew must find a way to survive. Will they stop the alien? And is the alien the biggest threat to the crew?

What did I like…

You can accomplish a lot with a simple idea. The concept of a monster on the loose in a confined area killing people is nothing new. But Alien presents itself so well that the unoriginal premise never impacts it.

Firstly, Dan O’Bannon’s script is a marvel of showing without telling and natural characterization. The Nostromo crew aren’t action heroes but everyday people who just want to complete their job and go home. Actions define these people. Rather than being handed information we discover more about them and their world through their interactions. The space setting also makes most of their lapses in judgment feel warranted and serves the narrative. Because running away is impossible. Thus, when the alien begins stalking the crew, the film becomes tenser because we relate to and fear for these people. And dread is built effectively because of what is left to the imagination. The alien itself is constantly changing and the company the characters work for is just a vague entity hanging over them, playing on our fears of the unknown.

The acting of Alien also works with the writing to create a believable world in an unbelievable situation. The actors use understated and restrained delivery to sell their characters. Even their hysteria feels natural and not forced. With each actor adding something to their performance that makes them feel unique. Whether it be Sigourney Weaver’s hard attitude, John Hurt’s everyday charm or Harry Dean Stanton’s goofy obliviousness. Many of the characters are memorable. Even if the writing was not strong these actors would still be able to carry the film.

Alien Cast
Sigourney Weaver, Ian Holm, John Hurt, Tom Skerritt, Veronica Cartwright, Yaphet Kotto, and Harry Dean Stanton in Alien

And then there is the production design and direction. The first thing most people think of when they think of Alien is H. R. Giger’s legendary creature design. Which evokes many subconscious fears. But it becomes scarier because we rarely see the whole thing on screen. Instead. we see close-ups or out of focus shots of it in the background. Again playing up the idea that what we don’t see is scarier. And the gothic, mechanical set design heightens the tension. We watch as the clinically clean safe rooms slowly change to unnerving mechanized monstrosities. With the direction letting atmosphere grow naturally through long shots and attention to editing. Allowing us to get use to the safety of certain things before slowly breaking them.

What I do not like…

But while the elements work together overall there are still hindrances that prevent the movie from being perfect. The film effectively builds atmospheric tension, but several jump scares are used at random points. Seemingly just to remind the audience that they are watching a horror film – which feels cheap.

Some could also argue that the characters feel a little underdeveloped. Because the script focuses more on their actions relating to their current situation many could claim that we don’t get to know the characters as individuals. We don’t get to learn all their facets as we have become used to in films. Which will be distancing for some. Also, while the actors mostly do a good job Tom Skerritt is a weak link. Unlike the rest of the cast, he feels ill-suited for his role as leader. He never leaves an impression, coming across more as whiny than as authoritative.

Finally, there are some lapses in logic that can take some audience members out of the experience. Some are relatively minor annoyances such as Ripley risking her life for Jonesy in the finale. Which doesn’t sync up with her previous characterisation as someone who puts survival first. But then there are bigger questions. Such as: if the company wanted the alien why did they entrust the job to space tuckers rather than a group of marines or people who would be more prepared to deal with the alien? And, Ash’s presentation in several scenes make his treacherous intentions too obvious to ultimately be surprising.

Verdict

Despite its hype and long legacy, Alien is still engaging all these years later. It does rely too much on jump scares. Some characters can be seen as underdeveloped. Tom Skerritt offers little to his part. And the plot requires the audience to suspend their disbelief a lot. But these flaws never damage the movie too much.

The characters are relatable people doing a job beyond their capabilities. And the film creates effective tension by keeping certain plot elements vague and unseen. The actors are also very natural in their roles making them easy to believe and giving them an innate likability. And it’s all played out against some of cinemas best production design. Which combined with the slower direction and pace creates a palpable atmosphere. It’s easy to see why everyone gravitated towards it. A genuine classic that deserves revisiting.

Verdict: 4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)

Alien (1979) Trailer
Reviews

Daydreaming With Stanley Kubrick

September 24, 2016

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Big Picture Film Club took a trip to one of the most talked about art exhibitions this summer: Daydreaming With Stanley Kubrick, held at London’s Somerset House. The exhibition featured a variety of paintings, installations, videos, and sculptures inspired by the late cinematic genius Stanley Kubrick. Much like Quentin Tarantino, George Lucas & Ridley Scott after him, Stanley Kubrick’s impressive body of work has given him a cult-like following, particularly after his death in 1999.

Curator, James Lavelle, has done an excellent job in putting together this mix-media exhibition. The 45 works on display flow effortlessly together and make for a seamless and captivating experience. While there were many great pieces of work on display, in no particular order here are some of our favourites from the exhibition:

1) Life, by Dexter Navy

This piece was distinct, in that it references current social commentary of civil unrest, as opposed to directly taking from Kubrick’s films. However, the intricate use of colour in this piece was inspired by the work of Kubrick.

2) Various Works, by Philip Castle

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Airbrush artist, Castle, who designed the original poster’s for Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange & Full Metal Jacket, gave the iconic posters a contemporary redesign, and showcasing a never used alternative design for Full Metal Jacket.

3) Camera A, Scene 136, Take 1, by Thomas Bangalter

Bangalter, one half of electronic duo Daft Punk, exemplifies what Kubric’s work is about with his simple, yet powerful video piece. The slow-mo clip features a person walking calmly through a pitch darkness engulfed in flames – the fire providing the only source of light, illuminating the ground below.

4) In Consolus – Full of Hope and Full of Fear, by James Lavelle & John Isaacs ft Azzi Glasser

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Immediately the senses are treated to an overload of sight, sound and smell. The clearly recognisable, Lolita inspired giant teddy bears gives a sense of fun and playfulness whilst the darkness of the room and the juxtaposed neon love sign hints at sinister undertones. Empty pantry boxes reference The Shining, 2001: A Space Odyssey inspired scent from perfume designer Glasser fills the room, whilst the soundtrack comes courtesy of: Detroit techno pioneer Carl Craig, Italian dance ensemble Planet Funk – Domenico “GG” Canu and Marco Barani, spoken word artist and designer Michele Lamy, and UNKLE collaborator Elliott Power.

6) Das Problem der Befahrung des Weltraums, by Norbet Shoerner

Norbet created a 360° virtual reality recreation of the Discovery One space. Breath taking in its redesign, fans of 2001: A Space Odyssey will feel as if they have been dropped right into the movie. Definitely one of the key highlights of the exhibition!

7) History Painting, by Marc Quinn

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Quinn draws from media reportage of social unrest, amplifying the sense of violence and unease with the contrasting use of colour.

8) The Shining Carpet, by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin

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Immediately recognisable, no Kubrick exhibition would be complete without the iconic print carpet from the Overlook Hotel. The print continues to inspire artists of all mediums.

9) Clockwork Britain, by Paul Insect

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Famous for his street art, Insect alludes to violence and the alienated youth in A Clockwork Orange by fusing 60s pop art and contemporary street art with the use of bold colours and the Union Jack motif.

10) Metanoia, by Polly Morgan

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Morgan explicitly exhibits the implicit sexual imagery we see from Alex and his Droogs in A Clockwork Orange. The downward pointing triangle is traditionally referred to as the chalice, symbolising the flow of water, the grace of heaven, and the womb – an ancient symbol of female divinity. Seeing this stuffed uncomfortably with a serpent, provokes very real feelings of disturbance just as when we watched those awful scenes in the film itself.